On my current client project, in terms of managing configuration of the various environments, I have separated things into two problem spaces – provisioning hosts, and configuring hosts. Part of the reason for this separation is that although targeting AWS, we do need to allow us to support alternative services in the future, but I also consider the type of tasks to be rather different and to require different types of tools.

For provisioning hosts I am using the Python AWS API Boto. For configuring the hosts once provisioned, I am using Puppet. I remain unconvinced as to the relative merits of PuppetMaster or Chef Server (see my previous post on the subject) and so have decided to stick with using PuppetSolo so I can manage versioning how I would like. This leaves me with a challenge – how do I apply the puppet configuration for the hosts once provisioned with Boto? I also wanted to provide a relatively uniform command-line interface to the development team for other tasks like running builds etc. Some people use cron-based polling for this, but I wanted a more direct form of control. I also wanted to avoid the need to run any additional infrastructure, so mcollective was never something I was particularly interested in.

After a brief review of my “Things I should look at later” list it looked like time to give Fabric a play.

Fabric is a Python-based tool/library which excels at creating command-line tools for machine management. It’s bread and butter is script-based automation of machines via SSH – many people in fact use hand-rolled scripts on top of Fabric as an alternative to systems like Chef and Puppet. The documentation is very good, and I can heartily recommend the Fabric tutorial.

The workflow I wanted was simple. I wanted to be able to checkout a specific version of code locally, run one command to bring up a host and also apply a given configuration set. My potentially naive solution to this problem is to simply tar up my puppet scripts, upload them, and then run puppet. Here is the basic script:

[python]
@task
def provision-box():
public_dns = provision_using_boto()

local("tar cfz /tmp/end-bundle.tgz path/to/puppet_scripts/*")
with settings(host_string=public_dns, user="ec2-user", key_filename="path/to/private_key.pem"):
run("sudo yum install -y puppet")
put("/tmp/end-bundle.tgz", ".")
run("tar xf end-bundle.tgz && sudo puppet –modulepath=/home/ec2-user/path/to/puppet_scripts/modules path/to/puppet_scripts/manifests/myscript.pp")
[/python]

The provision_using_boto() command is an exercise left to the reader, but the documentation should point you in the right direction. If you stuck the above command in your fabfile.py, all you need to do is run fab provision-box to do the work. The first yum install command is there to handle bootstraping of puppet (as it is not on the AMIs we are using) – this will be a noop if the target host already has it installed.

This example is much more simplified than the actual scripts as we have also implemented some logic to re-use ec2 instances to save time & money, and also a simplistic role system to manage different classes of machines. I may write up those ideas in a future post.

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